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Things to see in Worms

There are lots of beautiful sights to discover in Worms: the Romanesque Cathedral, Europe’s oldest Jewish cemetery, the synagogue in the old town, the world’s biggest Reformation monument (Luther Monument), the multimedia Nibelungen Museum, wonderful green spaces with gently splashing fountains, the Hagen statue on the Rhine promenade, Herrnsheim Palace and Park and much more. Enjoy your voyage of discovery through our beautiful city!

 

Sights

St Peter’s Cathedral (Dom St. Peter) 
St Peter’s Cathedral (Dom St. Peter)

St Peter’s Cathedral (Dom St. Peter)

Romanesque pillar basilica with a double choir and a transept, built 1125/1130 – 1181 on the foundations of a structure erected by Bishop Burchard (1000 – 1025). Elaborate decorations in the east and west choirs. The “Emperor’s portal” on the north side is the setting of the “quarrel of the queens” in the Nibelungenlied epic. Gothic south portal (pre-13th century) with representational designs displaying an “illustrated stone Bible” ; Gothic St Nicholas chapel adjoining. The cathedral’s interior features Romanesque and late-Gothic stone sculptures. After the city’s devastation in 1689, the east choir was given a baroque design (high altar by Balthasar Neumann). Burial vault with sarcophagi of five generations of Salian dukes (10th – 11th centuries). St John’s baptistery in front of the south front demolished in 1807. 

Open for sight-seeing:
in summer 9 am – 6 pm,
in winter 10 am – 5 pm.

 

St Magnus’ Church (Magnuskirche) 
St Magnus’ Church (Magnuskirche)

St Magnus’ Church (Magnuskirche)

Former Carolingian one-room church (8th / 9th century), extended later. Parish church of the former St Andrew’s chapter. Early Protestant preaching church and hotbed of the Reformation in Worms around 1521.

 

City of Worms Museum (Museum der Stadt Worms) 
City of Worms Museum (Museum der Stadt Worms)

City of Worms Museum (Museum der Stadt Worms)

Romanesque church and cloister (12th / 13th), Gothic extensions and more recent alterations. Former collegiate church. The City of Worms Museum illuminating the city’s pre- and early history, the Roman, Franconian, Mediaeval and modern eras. Luther room. A must-see model of the city. 

Open:
Tue – Sun 10 am  – 5 pm.

 

Luginsland (R. Uhrig) 
Luginsland (R. Uhrig)

Luginsland

Historic vineyard site by the city wall running along Andreasstrasse / Willy-Brandt-Ring. Emperor Frederick II had his son, the German king Henry VII, incarcerated here in 1235 in the “Luginsland” (“view of the country”) tower.

 

Jewish Cemetery (Jüdischer Friedhof “Heiliger Sand” ) 
Jewish Cemetery (Jüdischer Friedhof “Heiliger Sand” )

Jewish Cemetery (Jüdischer Friedhof “Heiliger Sand” )

Europe’s oldest extant Jewish cemetery with some 2,500 gravestones (oldest tombstone from 1058 / 1059). Impressive view of the cathedral from the younger part on the former outer city ramparts (“Buber view”). 

Open:
summertime 8 am - 8 pm,
wintertime 8 pm till dusk,

closed on saturdays and on jewish holidays.

Fridays and before jewish holidays:
end of Oct. - end of March    8 am – 4 pm
April                                   8 am - 7 pm
May – July                           8 am – 8 pm
August - September              8 am – 7 pm
October                               8 am – 6 pm  
Entrance free !

 

Heylshof Museum 
Heylshof Museum

Heylshof Museum

Art museum with a notable collection of paintings, china, small-scale sculptures, stained glass, glass, ceramic, and graphic art. Special exhibitions. 

Open:
May – Sep  Tue – Sun 11 am – 5 pm ,
Oct – Apr Sun 11 am – 5 pm , Tue – Sat 2 pm – 5 pm ,
closed Jan – 15 Feb.

 

Heylshof Gardens (Heylshofpark) (former bishop’s palace) 
Heylshof Gardens (Heylshofpark) (former bishop’s palace)

Heylshof Gardens (Heylshofpark) (former bishop’s palace)

Before its destruction in 1689, the bishop’s palace was the scene of the momentous confrontation between Emperor Charles V and Martin Luther on 17 / 18 April 1521. A plaque marks the former location of the palace. The multi-winged palace structure with its stairway, which was the place of the city’s legal proceedings, was replaced in the 18th century by a baroque palace, which in turn was destroyed in 1794.

 

Luther Memorial (Lutherdenkmal)  
Luther Memorial (Lutherdenkmal)

Luther Memorial (Lutherdenkmal)

One of the world’s largest Reformation memorial, completed in 1868 and based on a design by Ernst Rietschel. Statues and emblems illustrate Reformation history, with Martin Luther and the Diet of Worms in the centre.

 

Wheel of Fortune (Schicksalsrad) 
Wheel of Fortune (Schicksalsrad)

Wheel of Fortune (Schicksalsrad)

Double-sided, rotating bronze wheel created in 1986 by Gustav Nonnenmacher. One side shows events that impacted on the city, the other depicts scenes from everyday local life.

 

Winegrowers’ Fountain (Winzerbrunnen) 
Winegrowers’ Fountain (Winzerbrunnen)

Winegrowers’ Fountain (Winzerbrunnen)

Created in 1983 by Gustav Nonnenmacher. Centre of the Kämmererstrasse pedestrian area. Wine-related historic scenes and allegories pay tribute to Worms’ significance as a winegrowing city.

 

Ludwig Square (Ludwigsplatz) 
Ludwig Square (Ludwigsplatz)

Ludwig Square (Ludwigsplatz)

Memorial with obelisk and a fountain flanked by lions recalling Ludwig IV, Grand Duke of Hesse. Originally set in a small park.

 

St Martin’s Church (St. Martin) 
St Martin’s Church (St. Martin)

St Martin’s Church (St. Martin)

Three-aisled Romanesque pillar basilica (11th  –  13th) with a straight-ended choir. Former collegiate church. According to the legend, St Martin of Tours was incarcerated in a dungeon beneath the church.

 

Martin’s Gate (Martinstor) 
Martin’s Gate (Martinstor)

Martin’s Gate (Martinstor)

Built in 1904 to designs by Georg Metzler, inspired by the forms of the city’s former northern city gate (destroyed in 1689).

 

Synagogue and Jewish Quarter 
Synagogue and Jewish Quarter

Synagogue and Jewish Quarter

Worms, Varmayza in Hebrew, had a prosperous Jewish community from the 11th century on. Beautifully restored buildings in the former Jewish Quarter around Judengasse (Jews’ Alley). Romanesque synagogue (first building from 1034, rebuilt in 1174 / 1175, destroyed in 1938 / 1941, reconstruction completed in 1961) with women’s synagogue and ritual bath (mikvah , 1185 / 1186).

Open:
Apr – Oct  10 am – 12.30 pm, 1.30 pm – 5 pm ,
Nov – Mar 10 am – 12 am, 2 pm – 4 pm.

 

Jewish Museum in Rashi House 
Jewish Museum in Rashi House

Jewish Museum in Rashi House
(Jüdisches Museum im Raschihaus)

Supposed former site of the Jewish school, where the famous Jewish scholar Rashi studied around 1060. Part of the ground floor preserved from the Middle Ages. The present building (completed in 1982) is modelled on the former structure and houses the Jewish museum and the municipal archive.

Open:
Apr – Oct Tue – Sun 10 am – 12.30 pm, 1.30 pm – 5 pm,
Nov – Mar Tue – Sun 10 am – 12.30 pm, 1.30 pm – 4.30 pm.

 

Woog Bridge (Woogbrücke) 
Woog Bridge (Woogbrücke)

Woog Bridge (Woogbrücke)

Remains of the impressive ramparts of the former bastion (17th century ?). The bastion provided one of the main accesses to the mediaeval city.

 

Frederick’s Church and Red House (Friedrichskirche und Rotes Haus) 
Frederick’s Church and Red House (Friedrichskirche und Rotes Haus)

Frederick’s Church and Red House
(Friedrichskirche und Rotes Haus)

Church of the Reformist community, built in 1744. The Red House, the only extant bourgeois Renaissance structure, built in 1624, today houses a Protestant community centre.

 

St Paul’s Church (Pauluskirche) 
St Paul’s Church (Pauluskirche)

St Paul’s Church (Pauluskirche)

Built in 1016 by Bishop Burchard on the foundations of the Salian ducal castle as a three-aisled pillar basilica (11th – 13th century). Romanesque choir and western building with octagonal dome (13th century). Nave remodelled as a baroque hall after the city’s devastation in 1689. The towers’ tops are inspired by Oriental architecture (“pagan towers”). Portal with a replica of the Bernward Doors of St Mary’s Cathedral in Hildesheim. Former collegiate church. Today the chapter buildings and the cloister house a Dominican monastery. Church of the Reformist community, built in 1744. The Red House, the only extant bourgeois Renaissance structure, built in 1624, today houses a Protestant community centre.

 

Nibelungen Museum 
Nibelungen Museum

Nibelungen Museum and Gate Tower Square (Torturmplatz)

Multimedia museum about the mediaeval epic, attached to the mediaeval city wall, opened in 2001 as a “walkable audio book” on the Nibelungenlied. Underground “Myth lab” with multimedia information hub on sagas and myths of the world. 

Open:
Tue – Fri 10 am – 5 pm,
Sat, Sun, public holidays 10 am – 6 pm.

Gate tower square with “Siegfried’s tomb”, a mound flanked by two sandstone menhirs.

 

Nibelungen Museum and Gate Tower Square (Torturmplatz)  
Nibelungen Museum and Gate Tower Square (Torturmplatz)

Romanesque House Wall

Preserved wall of a grand residential house (early 13th).

 

City Hall (Rathaus), Market Square (Marktplatz) 
City Hall (Rathaus), Market Square (Marktplatz)

City Hall (Rathaus), Market Square (Marktplatz), Fountain of Justice (Gerechtigkeitsbrunnen)

The City Hall (1958) was the site of the grammar school after the city’s destruction in 1689. The late-mediaeval town hall (“civic court”) was situated in today’s Hagenstrasse. Fountain of Justice, originally erected at the site of today’s Siegfried fountain in 1778 as a watering place.

 

Trinity Church (Dreifaltigkeitskirche) 
Trinity Church (Dreifaltigkeitskirche)

Trinity Church (Dreifaltigkeitskirche)

Built by the magistrate in the form of a baroque hall (1709–1725) as a Lutheran and Reformation memorial church. After its destruction in the Second World War, reconstruction (1955 – 1958) to plans by Otto Bartning, who also designed the interior in the contemporary style.

 

Siegfried Fountain (Siegfriedbrunnen) 
Siegfried Fountain (Siegfriedbrunnen)

Siegfried Fountain (Siegfriedbrunnen)

Heptagonal fountain (1921) with larger than life-sized statue of Siegfried the dragon-slayer, based on designs by Adolf von Hildebrand. Gift of Cornelius Wilhelm von Heyl, a former local leather magnate.

 

Baroque Building 
Baroque Building

Baroque Building

Stately and prestigious bourgeois residence (1725). Birthplace of the composer Rudi Stephan (1887 – 1915).

 

Hagen Statue 
Hagen Statue

Rhine Promenade (Rheinpromenade) and Hagen Statue

Park laid out in the 1920s. A pleasure ground worth visiting with shipping piers and a variety of cafés and restaurants. The Hagen statue, created by Johannes Hirt in 1905, recalls the Nibelungenlied warrior Hagen sinking the treasure of the Nibelungen in the river.

more

Rhine Promenade (Rheinpromenade)  
Rhine Promenade (Rheinpromenade)
 

City Wall (Stadtmauer) 
City Wall (Stadtmauer)

City Wall (Stadtmauer)

Begun in 900, with major parts still extant, the city wall backs against the museum of the city next to the wall opening at St Andrew’s Gate (Andreastor, 1907), towers the city moat behind the cathedral’s west choir on the foundations of the former Roman wall, and marks the north side of the Jewish Quarter with an opening in the wall (1907) at Rashi Gate. Gate Tower Square offers the most impressive view of its obverse towards the east, with the major and lesser Rhine Gates, the Civic Tower, the Fishermen’s Gateway, and the Gate Tower.

photo gallery City walls

 

Church of Our Lady (Liebfrauenkirche) 
Church of Our Lady (Liebfrauenkirche)

Church of Our Lady (Liebfrauenkirche)

Late-Gothic pilgrimage church (13th  –  15th centuries), set in the renowned vineyard “Liebfrauenstift – Kirchenstück”. Only extant major church on the Rhine between the famous Strasbourg and Cologne cathedrals that is built in a purely Gothic style.

 
 
Herrnsheim Palace (Schloss Herrnsheim) 
Herrnsheim Palace (Schloss Herrnsheim)

Herrnsheim Palace (Schloss Herrnsheim)

Approximately 4 km north of the city centre, Herrnsheim is a baroque palace with English-style gardens built by Wolfgang E. von Dalberg (1711–1740) and his son Heribert (1740–1792) on the site of a 15th-century castle. Partially destroyed during the French Revolution, it was rebuilt in the years leading up to 1824. The current imperial style dates from work carried out between 1840 and 1845. Worms industrialist Cornelius W. Heyl bought the palace in 1883 and in 1957/58 the Barons von Heyl sold it to the City of Worms. The mediaeval round tower houses a library, French picture wallpaper on the first floor, and original ceiling and wall paintings on the ground floor. There are also outbuildings from the second half of the 18th century, landscaped gardens with meadows, woodland, ponds and islands.

 

If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to contact the Tourist Information.