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Luther Room

Worms around 1521, St Magnus' Church and St Andrew's Seminary, 3-D rendering by FaberCourtial 
Worms around 1521, St Magnus' Church and St Andrew's Seminary, 3-D rendering by FaberCourtial

Housed in the former St Andrew's Seminary, the Luther Room in the Worms City Museum presents correspondence, historical coins and crafts objects that relate specifically to Luther's sojourn here. Many of the pieces exhibited in the room explicitly reference the originals in the Luther Library, which are kept in the City Library in Worms.

It also shows the portrayal of Luther's head, designed originally by Ernst Rietschel for the Luther Monument. 

The Luther Room in St Andrew's Seminary, photo: Rudolf Uhrig 
The Luther Room in St Andrew's Seminary, photo: Rudolf Uhrig
Exterior view of St Andrew's Seminary, photo: Rudolf Uhrig 
Exterior view of St Andrew's Seminary, photo: Rudolf Uhrig
The cloister in St Andrew's Seminary, photo: Rudolf Uhrig 
The cloister in St Andrew's Seminary, photo: Rudolf Uhrig

The paramount importance of Martin Luther for the city of Worms and its history, and – by inverse logic – the implications of the Diet of Worms for the major reformer and his teachings, are reflected in the creation of the 'Luther Room', which belongs to the Worms City Museum.

The Luther Room was opened in 1983 as part of the permanent exhibition on the first floor of the City Museum, marking the 500th anniversary of its eponym's birth. It is an educational presentation that uses correspondence, historical coins and crafts objects to accentuate Luther's role in connection with the 1521 Diet of Worms.

Many of the pieces exhibited in the room explicitly reference the valuable originals in the Luther Library, which are kept in the City Library in Worms. A bronzed face mask portraying the major reformer bears witness to the personage Martin Luther and his seminal importance.

Designed by the sculptor Ernst Rietschel in 1860, it is one of the items used to prepare the Luther Monument that was inaugurated on Lutherplatz in Worms in 1868. The monument and the design also paint a vivid picture of the lasting effects and interpretative tradition associated with Martin Luther, his words and his writings, which continue to reverberate into the present day.

The exhibition room focuses on more than the man and the scholar Martin Luther. Instead, it illuminates the local and historical circumstances of the Imperial Free City of Worms anno 1521, as well as the journey and arrival of Martin Luther on 16 April.

 
St Magnus' Church and St Andrew's Seminary as they were before 1689, drawing by Hamman, photo: Worms City Archive 
St Magnus' Church and St Andrew's Seminary as they were before 1689, drawing by Hamman, photo: Worms City Archive